Testimonials – Research

Testimonials tagged with Research:

Research on Sorting Algorithms

I meant to email you a long time ago, but kept putting it off until the work was published. Anyway, I used Random.org data initially for my final year project in 2003/2004. It was research on sorting algorithms in the presence of caches and branch predictors. Back then the data was available for download in 10MB blocks, and there were 16 of them. So I uses all of them, 'cat'ed together, as the data to be sorted.

I extended this into a Tech Report in 2005, and a paper in 2006, which got published in the ACM Journal of Experimental Algorithmics (eventually, in June).

Having truly random data made me certain my results weren't due to my errors, and having so much of it made my sure it wasn't an anomaly. That was especially useful as a mere undergrad, when I wasn't really sure what I was doing.

Thanks a lot for Random.org, and for the data.

—Paul Biggar, Trinity College Dublin

Conducting a Linguistics Study

For the experiment I'm conducting for my MA thesis (linguistics) I needed to create a randomised list. The experiment contains 36 times an order of three pictures, of which the participant needs to select one as correct. The order of these three pictures had to be one of the 6 possibilities for each of the 36 items (ABC, ACB etc), and I had to make three different versions. Fortunately for me I found the list randomiser on your website Random.org. I gave each possibility a number, entered all six numbers six times and clicked randomise. Within a few seconds, I had three different versions of sequences! This saved me quite some time!

I will of course refer to the randomiser correctly in MLA style in my thesis.

Thank you for providing this free opportunity online.

—Ingrid Souillé

Neuroscience Experiments

Hello,

I have been using the random sequence generator for about a year to create slot machine simulations for neuroscience experiments. Thanks so much, your site is great!

—Paul Campion, National Institutes of Health, USA

Clinical Data Studies

I use Random.org to decide a sample population for individual studies. Last month when I went to generate the numbers it appeared the site was gone—but you're back! Thanks for this great free program.

—Sally B. Buttry, Quality and Safety Services, Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital, Illinois

Conducting a Survey of Medical Residents

I Googled onto your site to find a random number generator for my wife's PhD dissertation. She is doing a double blind type survey of medical residents. We used your tables to feed a MS Word macro that applies a random number (300 count) to each page of an 18-page survey. 300×18 is a big Word file. Then we printed the surveys as required for each school's survey requirements.

Your site is a great source and we appreciate your effort.

—Charles Lloyd

Demographic Study of a Bibliographic Database

I used Random.org in 2004 to create a sample of bibliographic records in OCLC WorldCat for a demographic study of that bibliographic database. The results were published in my article, ‘From the Ubiquitous to the Nonexistent: A Demographic Study of OCLC WorldCat,’ Library Resources & Technical Services 50 (2): 79-90, Spring 2006.

I have since taken two samples for further studies of WorldCat.

Download: PDF, 221 KiB

—Prof. Jay H. Bernstein, Kingsborough Community College, Brooklyn, New York

Conducting a Study on War Veterans

Thank you for offering the random number generator. I have used it for a research on the effects of target specific communications in a N=2000 population of Dutch War Veterans. In the experimental setting is was necessary to randomise the research population and to divide them over four sub-groups, similar in size. The only acceptable way was to do so by adding a randomised variable in SPSS. Afterwards it was possible to assign the subjects to one of the groups by sorting on the randomized variable. Of course I gave due credit in the report by mentioning your service and revealing the URL.

—drs. Rudy C. de Jong, Dronten Professional Agricultural University, The Netherlands

Psychology Research

Hi,

I'm just writing to say a big thank you for creating your lovely sequence generator. It has helped me so much in my area of psychological research, very simply by creating a sequence for me to administer experimental tasks. But without it, my job would have been a lot more difficult.

Thank you very much.

—Meredith Blampied

Visual Psychophysics Studies

I use Random.org to generate a random order for multiple stimuli used in human psychophysical testing. It's a welcome improvement over the book of random number tables I used in my youth, long ago.

—Professor Mark Dubin, University of Colorado

Health Thesis Work

I just wanted to let you know that and how I've used your delightful service. In the course of writing my thesis I needed to be able to randomly assign 15 items to five different categories and then randomly order the categories. I was going to use old fashioned D&D dice for the job but found your site and was able to do it in far less time! Thanks a lot, and you will be cited in my final document.

—Rose Campbell, Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, Oregon Health & Science University

Ophtamology Trials

I've been using your Random.org website to help create experiments for the last year and a half (by making sure trial orders are random) and would just like to say thank you for making it available. I was working in cognitive psychology as an undergrad and am now working in ophthamology at Johns Hopkins as a research assistant. Needless to say, both fields use numerous trials in experiments and the ability to quickly get ten to twenty lists of random sequences has made it very easy to gain more control in the research I'm working on.

—Francesca Fortenbaugh, Johns Hopkins University

Retaining Anonymity among Research Participants

I am using the number generator to randomly assign research participants in an experiment. It's very important that anonymity be maintained, as the questionnaires they answer contain very personal info. I use the generator to assign numbers to each folder, then when people come in they get the next folder in the stack. I am also a lecturer in statistics at the University of New Mexico and will be using the generator to talk about probability! Thanks!

—Marianna D. LaNoue, Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico

Simulating Virus Infection

I study the life-cycle of viruses, and I perform lots of tissue culture experiments. In order to try to develop theories to explain some results I was getting, I wrote a computer program that uses a Monte Carlo scheme to simulate infection of cells by viruses. I need a different random number for each simulated virus, in order to randomly assign it to a cell that it ‘infects.’ In order for the results to be meaningful, I need to simulate tens of thousands of ‘cells’ and hundreds of thousands of ‘viruses,’ so I need hundreds of thousands of random numbers. The pseudo-random numbers produced by the Apple Macintosh built-in linear congruental generator proved themselves to be not good enough for the job, as I found that some numbers were chosen too often, a definite no-no for my purposes. Then I saw the NY Times article about this site and gave it a try. First I tried using Random.org numbers to seed the Macintosh generator at frequent intervals during the execution of the simulation, but it did not solve the problem. So I tested using all numbers from this site and they passed my quality test. So now I download several batches at a time of 10,000 numbers between 1 and 40,000 and string them into big files as the sources of my numbers. I'd like to be able to download them in even bigger batches, though. Thanks for a truly useful service!

—David N. Levy, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Simulating the Beta Decay of Nuclei

I used your random number page to get truly random numbers between 0–99 in order to study the Monte Carlo method for arithmetic solution of problems and to simulate the beta decay of nuclei. Thanks a lot, it saved me the trouble of having to input into MS Excel, 500 numbers, which were pseudo-random, anyway.

—Yannis Thomopoulos, Department of Physics, University of Athens

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