Testimonials – Security

Testimonials tagged with Security:

Generating Authentication Codes for PBX System

It was a pleasure using your extremely quick and efficient random number generator service.

I'm currently using it to assign authentication codes to the users of my PBX system, so I know who's authorized to make international calls, etc. I was facing the problem that if I started assigning authentication codes in serial order, people might guess others' authentication codes and misuse them.

I wish to thank you for putting up this free service for the use of one-shot users like me, I really appreciate it.

—Arvind Ranganath, Hong Kong

Safe Password Generation and Disposal

Many thanks for your interesting and useful site. The various interfaces are nice and clean, direct to the point. I recently used the list randomizer and integer generator (over the secure connection, of course) to create a truly random password. Once I had it memorized and had to dispose of the slip it was written on, I went through a fairly rigorous obfuscation process to obscure the data on the paper, then cut it up into pieces, and used your random value generators to decide which pieces were going to go into which garbage cans.

—Brian Mearns

Generating Wi-Fi Encryption Keys

I'm an IT-consultant. I use Random.org regularly to generate random keys for www.coachteam.com, a coaching company who has to make sure the data of their clients is save and privacy is guaranteed. I use your random strings to update the Wi-Fi access points WPA2-keys every few months and to encrypt/decrypt client data in our database.

As a mathematical engineering graduate (University of Leuven, Belgium), I understand the difficulty about true randomness and I would like to thank you to make my work a little bit easier!

—David Ariens, Web Innovation, Belgium

Generating Random Long-Distance Codes

I just wanted to say thanks for the site. We use 5 digit long distance codes for our Osceola County phone system. Your site has made creating a random list of codes to issue to employees a breeze.

—Joel Gomer

Making Seeds for Password Generation

Hi, I'm using Random.org to seed the PRNG Mersenne Twister to create random passwords at goodpassword.com.

—David Jourard

Generating Combinations for Electronic Locks

I am an Institutional Locksmith working for a large East Coast medical facility. While Mike Bardsley CML uses the generator for random key bittings, I use it to generate random six-digit combinations for electronic combination locks. We have many of these locks throughout our facility and need to assign each a different combination. Using your generator assures that we won't use the same combination more than once.

—Charles H. Park Jr. CIL

Generating Internet Café Passwords

Firstly, thanks for Random.org. Excellent! Secondly, here's what I use Random.org for. To protect me from keyboard and mouse loggers when I'm at an Internet cafe, I use Random.org to give me a page of random numbers, from which I pick my password pieces and copy and paste them into a log in form. That way, the next time the page is served the numbers will be in a different place. Thirdly, to make this even more secure, I would love to be able to get a page of randomly organised letters (a-z) (and maybe even punctuation!) for my passwords. Thanks again!

—Peter Lovett, Australia

Locksmith's Key Generation

I'm using Random.org to generate new discreet keys for each home or business rekeys, ensuring that no two customers will ever receive the same key bitting. I'm using the randomized sequence generator. For a 6 six pin lock, I enter the first two digits and let the generator pick the rest, i.e., 14XXXX.

There is a Maximum Adjacent Cut Specification (MACS) that varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. For instance, with a Schlage brand lock the maximum useable difference between two adjacent cuts on a key is 7 depths. This means throwing out many numbers generated randomly, but they're very easy to spot on a printed page. I begin using first two pins of 00 and progress them to 99. Even considering the toss outs, that will provide me with more key bittings than I will ever need.

I've only just begun using this, as I've just discovered your site, but it seems to work really well.

—Mike Bardsley CML

Generating Tokens for Wi-Fi Access

Here at Bitbuzz, we use Random.org to generate access token for our users. They are given a paper token with four words printed on it, and we use Random.org to generate these word sequences from a list of thousands of words. Much easier to copy into a form than a password, and just as secure!

—Alex French, Bitbuzz, Ireland

Key Generation for Wireless Network Cards

A friend of mine suggested that I use Random.org to generate 128 bit (16 byte) WEP keys for 802.11a or 802.11b wireless cards. Works great!

—Phillip Remaker, Cisco, USA

Testing Encryption Routines

I'm using the random numbers to help me create block ciphers for custom encryption routines. I do this more out of fun though a lot of my ‘research’ ends up in production systems. I've actually contributed to your third party HTTP clients. I wrote the ASP contribution. I'm particularly pleased to see the sequence generator. This is absolutely critical for my latest project—developing an ASCII friendly encryption routine for email and web use. In this sort of application, I use ASCII values with a value 32 pedestal and a 126 threshold to eliminate any special characters from being used (and likely altered) by an email or web transfer protocol. Results thus far have been great.

—Randy Tate

Generating Photocopier Codes

Dear Mr. Random,

I used your random generator. I am an office specialist at a University department. It is my responsibility to enter and close out all the accounts on our department copier. The copier does not allow me to actually erase existing accounts. Since you need a 8-digit passcode to access your account and use the copier, I instead ‘close’ the account by changing the passcode on that account to something the previous user will not know.

This month I'll have to do around 200 such entries on the copier. I got sick of devising my own numbers, so I searched on the internet for a random number producer, and I found you. It was fun producing numbers. I definitely fulfilled my geek quota for the next year.

—Jason Miller, University of Minnesota

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